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is the next question. >> caller: the standards and technology. the agency tasked with buildis fail -- >> host three mike. do you have ollowup question? we undd whe you are going. >> caller: sample -- >> host: we'll see what the senator has to say about that. 9/11 conspiracy theories and different ways of looking at 9/11. what are your thoughts? >> guest: you know, the report that i go by is 9/11 commission frankly, many of the recommendations and assessments have become very relevant this week as we have dealt with a shocking tragedy in tbons. and, you know, actually given me this week an opportunity to reflect on how far we have come, for example, with homeland security in the ten years since that agency was created. as you noted, i'm on the home land security and government affairs committee, and, you know, they are hard at work. the joint terrorism task force through the fbi and homeland security and local officials in boston and trying to bring answers and bring ultimately the perpetrators to bear the full weight of justice in the united states. but, you know, back to the caller's questio
's because of years of federal support to develop hydrofracking technology. the eastern gas shales project was an initiative the federal government began back in 1976 before hydrofracking was a mature industry. the project set up and funded dozens of pilot demonstration projects with universities and private gas companies that tested drilling and fracturing methods. this investment by the federal government was instrumental in the development of the commercial extraction of natural gas from shale. in fact, microseismic imaging, a critical tool used in fracking, was originally developed by sandia national laboratory, a federal energy laboratory. the industry was also supported through tax breaks and subsidies. in fact, mitchell energy vice president dan stewart said in an interview that mitchell energy's first horizontal well was subsidized by the federal government. mr. mitchell said, and i quote -- "d.o.e., that's the department of energy, d.o.e. started it and other people took the ball and ran with it. you cannot diminish d.o.e.'s involvement." so the basis of the natural gas revolution
is technology. technology is changing rapidly and the postal service is not able to make those changes in a very nimble and quick fashion. so we believe these are the type of changes that ought to be y theongress, and it's very important for the gislatcosequences both for the postal service, the american people and the finances of that entity as well since thank you. i am happy to entertain questions at the appropriate time. >> good morning, chairman, ranking member cummings and members of the committee. i serve as the chairman of the board of governors of the united states postal service. i honored to be asked to testify and thank you for inviting me today. the postal service plays an incredible role in the american economy it provides a national platform that every business and president relies on in the directly supports and 800 billion-dollar manning industry that employs 8 million people. america needs a financially healthy postal service. it needs a service that can adapt to changes and technology and the habits of american consumers. it needs a postal service that inspires confidence in t
they needed to replace older security equipment and technology, expand restricted we keyway system ems and place security levers on all doors which allowed teachers to lock tours doors from the inside. you may say that's not expensive. why do you need to spend money? it sure adds up when you really want to secure a door and you want to do it right. so if you have many, many doors so we can help them do these things. and if they wanted to, make sure they harden their facility, that's what the money is for. now, there's a township in new jersey, they used funds to secure perimeter and playground areas by installing security gates at elementary and intermediate schools to create a safer learning environment. the new exterior fences define school boundaries making the schools safer for students. entourier gates were replaced, providing the ability to lock off specific areas of the schools during emergencies. again, it's common sense but when these schools were built, madam president, no one thought about this. everything was open. like the capitol, when i came here, i'm dating myself, a lo
shows in terms of sales volume, and we all know how we're using our technology more and more every day for our personal lives and how we defend on it. for example, the national shooting sports foundation surveyed owners of modern sporting rifles in 2010 and found that 10% of them, 10% of all rifles sold had purchased their firearms at gun shows, whereas 25% had purchased them online. 25%. believe me, i understand the political stakes for my colleagues and i sympathize. i have been there. i understand it. and comes from states like west virginia, and no state has a higher regard for the second amendment rights to bear arms than my state. in fact, on the great seal of the state of west virginia, the preamble is montani sember liberai. in latin, that means mountaineers are always free. you know how we feel. one of the review states that became a state during the civil war, broke away from virginia at that time. but west virginians are also guided by a little common sense. i have said this. in west virginia, we know what nonsense is, we know what common sense is, and now we know what gun s
and technology these is expanding those. i tried to pass it by unanimous consent. than schumer came up and said no, but i will pass, how about passing mind by unanimous consent? i was quite. i would've let this go by unanimous consent. they would have been shocked. i think it would've been great fun to see that all of the week as part of immigration reform just by unanimous consent. >> jerry? >> i have a couple of them. i had ask you why you think so highly of our late mayor, grover cleveland? >> f. i was allowed to go back when i wasn't alive, he seemed to be opposed to special interests. he also seemed to veto a bunch of bills, and i think that, you know, it was a time period, and i think some would call him a populist and i think that part of me feels that way. >> alex and then bolton. >> it was reported you were raising money for the national association for gun rights and it was just reported that last week this came up for conversation in the steering committee luncheon. susan collins was pretty upset about that because national association of gun rights is running ads in her state. she i
of research that is necessary to develop new means and possibly new technology, new tools that are institutions of higher learning but institutions of learning across the board, beginning with our elementary schools need to do better. and i am proud to be a cosponsor of this legislation. i look forward to working with my colleagues to assuring that it will be passed. and senator kaine, who spoke so evocatively and eloquently on this floor today and who showed such grace under pressure, which is one of the definitions of courage, in responding to the virginia tech tragedy, he has worked to deal with the wounds, and he has resolved to learn from virginia tech. and indeed he worked as a governor to seek safer campuses across virginia and across the country. he fought to put in place commonsense laws that were -- would prevent shooters like cho seung-hui from having access to the arsenal that he used six years ago. and i want to thank senator kaine for helping to lead the effort for a ban on high-capacity ammunition magazines like the ones used at virginia tech and used at new
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7

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